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  • A few years ago (when Arena Stage produced Sarah Ruhl’s Passion Play, a Cycle), Molly Smith said, “religion onstage” is the new “sex onstage”.  Religion has become a national hot topic, making Becoming Calvin most relevant art. 16th century faith differences were minute compared to our polyglot culture – what a great opportunity for art to create national dialogue and aid understanding.

–Anne Paine West, Cultivation and Stewardship Manager, Arena Stage

  • In fact, isn’t this a timeless tale? The balance of power between church and state is always at play, in every age and every country. People everywhere search for the truth, and are sometimes willing to risk everything for it. And yes, we “work out our own salvation” whether or not those are the words we might use to describe our existential explorations.

–From the blog Creativity and Calvin by Rev. Ruth Everhart

  • Becoming Calvin is a wonderfully crafted reminder of what a strong and essentially uncompromising individual can accomplish if the times are ripe for change.  An enlightening and thought-provoking exploration of one of the greatest figures in Protestant history.

–Doug Feaver, Washington, D.C. journalist

  • History is seldom recreated on stage with a level of authenticity, grace and  beauty that allows the audience to identify with and learn from earlier struggles between individual spiritual growth and established religious thought. Playwright Ann Timmons creates both with spirit, joy, and truth!

–Rev. Dr. Diane G. Murphy

  • . . . there is plenty of material in “Becoming Calvin” to prompt reflection in a modern audience. Young people today too are searching for some sense of purpose to which they can apply their gifts. . .They must be prepared to pay a price, as Calvin did, in leaving the places that are comfortable to them and sometimes being parted from dear friends who go in different directions. Perhaps, with interest and support elsewhere, this thought-provoking play may find audiences far beyond Washington, D.C.

–from an article in October 2012 issue of  The Layman, by Alan Wisdom